Alzheimer’s is now being called type 3 Diabetes

This “type 3 diabetes” is a term that has been proposed to describe the hypothesis that Alzheimer’s disease, which is a major cause of dementia, triggered by a type of insulin resistance and insulin-like growth factor dysfunction that occurs specifically in the brain

THE LINK BETWEEN DIABETES AND ALZHEIMER’S

It’s been suggested that Alzheimer’s may be triggered by insulin resistance in your brain. Some people say that Alzheimer’s is simply “diabetes in your brain.”

Diabetes may also cause chemical imbalances in your brain, which may trigger Alzheimer’s. Also, high blood sugar levels lead to inflammation, which may damage brain cells.

Research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

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SYMPTOMS OF TYPE 3 DIABETES

The symptoms of type 3 diabetes are described as the symptoms of dementia, such as those seen in early Alzheimer’s disease.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, these symptoms include:

  • memory loss that affects daily living and social interactions
  • difficulty completing familiar tasks
  • misplacing things often
  • decreased ability to make judgements based on information
  • sudden changes in personality or demeaner

WAYS TO PREVENT

  • EAT LESS SUGAR

Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. Sugar causes pre-diabetes and diabetes, which often leads to significant memory loss. ⁣⁣

  • MANAGE STRESS

Chronic stress takes a toll on your body and brain. Stress shrinks the hippocampus, the memory center of the brain. So, find your pause button every day and make time for some stress relief. Relaxation isn’t a luxury if you want to prevent or reverse dementia. Whether that involves deep breathing, meditation, or yoga, find something that helps you calm down.

  • GET QUALITY SLEEP

Studies show poor sleep becomes a risk factor for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Aim for at least 8 hours of quality sleep every night.⁣⁣

  • EXERCISE

We now know that physical activity can prevent and even slow down the progression of cognitive decline and brain diseases like dementia. Even a 30-minute walk can help. More active readers might want to incorporate high-intensity interval training or weight lifting.


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